Quarter Glass House / Proctor & Shaw


Quarter Glass House / Proctor & Shaw

© Stale Eriksen© Stale Eriksen© Stale Eriksen© Stale Eriksen+ 19


  • Zoned Area of ​​this architectural project Zoned:
    186 m²

  • Year Year of completion of this architecture project

    Year:


    2020


  • Photographs Photographs: Eriksen stale
© Stale Eriksen
© Stale Eriksen

Text description provided by the architects. A series of stepped levels and angular windows designed by Proctor and Shaw open the ground floor of an Edwardian terraced house onto a green and calm garden in South West London. Clients commissioned Proctor and Shaw to connect the ground floor to the 1.2m rear garden, challenging the architects to bring as much light and height as possible into the new extension.

© Stale Eriksen
© Stale Eriksen

An existing leaking PVC veranda was demolished to make way for a series of new interior levels. Proctor and Shaw dramatically lowered the ground floor and designed a sequence of stepped trays expanding the height, light and volume of the space. The gently sloping steps allow guests to descend gradually and in a controlled manner into the garden through separate but connected kitchen, dining and outdoor patio areas.

Plan - Proposed ground floor
Plan – Proposed ground floor

The two neighboring expansions presented a challenge, forcing Proctor and Shaw to think sideways about maintaining resident privacy and access to light while fulfilling the mandate of creating a bright, light home. The architects designed an L-shaped wrap-around extension with angular glazing, allowing site requirements to naturally dictate the shape of the building.

© Stale Eriksen
© Stale Eriksen

The resulting crown shape includes four distinct “quarter glass” windows of varying sizes. Just as the cars have quarter windows tailored to the vehicle body, Proctor and Shaw configured the glazing to better fit and serve the new family space.

© Stale Eriksen
© Stale Eriksen

The larger window, resting above the sliding doors to the garden, provides a slatted opening to draw light into the extension. A second “quarter glass” frames a comfortable window seat jutting into and facing the garden, while a third frameless trapezoidal window offers views of a newly created courtyard at the heart of the house. This space serves as both a skylight and a small service yard, connecting to a new utility space (which also doubles as a guest toilet) that allows noisy appliances, clothes dryers and other clutter to be stowed out of the new one. dining area of ​​the family kitchen. The fourth ‘glass quarter’ is a large triangular roof oculus, set in deeply framed support beams that control the view of the neighboring property.

Proposed section
Proposed section

As per the brief, the interiors of the extension are textured and warm in tones of copper and duck egg. The structural soffit of Douglas Fir ceilings is offset by large format light gray floor tiles that extend to the patio, blurring the lines between interior and exterior. At eye level, a seamless pale pink microcement acts as a wall finish and backsplash, accompanied by floating Douglas fir wood shelves that line the length of the kitchen.

© Stale Eriksen
© Stale Eriksen

Ikea kitchen cabinets have been customized with lightweight duck egg-shaped doors and drawers, allowing customers to breathe more to focus their finances on particular materials, including the covered birch plywood kitchen island. copper in the center of the room. Copper finishes are found in the sink, faucet and utensil hanger bars, balanced by a gray powder coated aluminum framed dining table, custom designed by Proctor and Shaw.



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